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SPF Print Championship 2019

Musselburgh Camera Club -

For those interested, the Scottish Photographic Federation Print Championship takes place tomorrow (17th February 2019) at the Stirling Court Hotel, Stirling University, Stirling FK9 4LA. The ticket desk opens at 9:30am and the competition finishes at 4:30pm. If you haven’t already found the information, here is a link to the details on the SPF web site:

https://www.scottish-photographic-federation.org/spf-print-championship

A timetable of the event is available at the following link:

https://www.scottish-photographic-federation.org/sites/default/files/downloads/print_championship_timetable_for_the_day_2019.pdf

14 February 2019 (Match That Image)

Musselburgh Camera Club -

On 14th February 2019 we hosted North Berwick Photographic Society for a “Match-an-Image” evening. This is a competition format we have not tried before, and it turned out to be great fun. Each team brings along a bank of 40 images. Teams in turn display one image, and the other team tries to match it with a similar image. Points are scored when the other team can’t find a match, or when the judge declares that your team have the best matching image.

The competition was judged by Joe Fowler, who tried hard to be unbiased even though he came from Musselburgh and had to judge several of his own images! This was an informal competition where banter and comments are encouraged. At one point the audience were astonished that an image of a herd of elephants was judged to be a match to juggling man dressed as a monkey! Well, they both have an animal theme.

North Berwick are masters at this competition, and matching their images turned out to be a lot harder than anticipated. Musselburgh had a few lucky breaks, but North Berwick had a really devious collection of opening images, and in the end North Berwick won by 33 points to 24. We learned a lot about the competition tactics by watching North Berwick, and we should be able to give them a closer competition next year. Some obvious changes we need to make next year are:

  • Make sure our team sits in a place where they can actually see the screen.
  • Print out some thumbnails of your images so you can actually see them.

It’s little things like this that make all the difference.

7 February 2019 (Audio Visual Evening)

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On 7th February 2019 we had our annual audio visual evening with Beeslack Penicuik Camera Club. The evening began once the elephant dancing class in the upstairs room had finished and our projector had stopped shaking. Musselburgh Camera Club kicked off with a presentation on the history of flight, leading to the Apollo moon landings in 1969 (with 2019 being the 50th Anniversary). Beeslack showed a presentation on the history of Glencourse Barracks (which will sadly be closing in in a few years) and a presentation on the history of the National Museum of Flight at East Fortune, which nicely contrasted with Musselburgh’s earlier presentation. Musselburgh then showed a presentation on how to make a presentation, which described the whisky-making process at the Highland Park distillery in Orkney. The evening finished with a moving tribute to John McCrae and an atmospheric abstract presentation mixing images of trees in the Scottish landscape with calming music. Once again, it was a pleasure to host Beeslack and share our audio visual projects.

Audio Visual Evening will be in G6

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This Thursday our audio visual evening with Beeslack Penicuik Camera Club will be in room G6 at Fisherrow, the large room at the end of the corridor on the left, rather than our usual room.

This Thursday is also the closing date for the “Abstract” set subject competition. Please send your 3 JPEG images, scaled to 1600×1200, to George Todd at georgetodd1957@me.com.

 

31 January 2019 (How Did You Do That)

Musselburgh Camera Club -

This week members shared their image processing hints and tips, revealed how to make some special effects or brought in questions to be answered. Here are some highlights from the discussion.

Removing unwanted objects.

Quiet often an image will lose marks because of a distraction in the background or a bright spot near the edge. The easiest way to remove the distractions is to crop the image, but what if you can’t? If cropping the image would remove something important, the other way to remove distractions is to used the “patch”, “clone stamp” and “healing brush” tools in Photoshop. The patch tool is great for removing distracting objects against a plain background (such as sky, grass or water). Look for the tool that looks like a sewn patch as shown here.

Make a selection around the object you want to remove, click in the middle and drag the patch somewhere else in the plain background. When you release the mouse the object will be removed. If your background has a pattern, such as waves or stripes, line up the pattern as best you can before releasing the mouse. Hint: You can remove a large or oddly-shaped area by patching it a bit at a time.

The clone stamp tool can be used for trickier patching jobs, like the image below. Select the tool looking like an ink stamp. Move the tool to an area you would like to copy and click while pressing the ALT key. Then move the tool to the place you would like to erase, line up the edges and start painting.

The “clone source” window (above) can help you to match the edges. If you are copying the top of the mountain but it is at the wrong angle, try changing the rotation. If you are cloning a background with a gradient, use the “Mirror horizontal” button to flip the gradient so your painted strokes don’t leave a sharp edge. Here are some more cloning hints:

  • After cloning, go over the same area with the healing brush to smooth over the edges and remove artefacts. Look for discontinuities and unnatural straight edges.
  • Try to clone from many different sources to avoid creating repeating patterns. When you have finished, look for duplicated objects and similar patterns and change the duplicates by passing the healing brush over them.

Local Tone Corrections

We have all been told to use the “brightness”, “levels” or “curves” tools in Photoshop to adjust the brightness and contrast, but what if your image only needs a partial correction? “camera raw” comes with a selection of very useful adjustment tools. The first is the “gradient tool”, shown below. First select the adjustment you would like to make (in this case a reduction in exposure and darkening the highlights) and then sweep with the mouse away from the part you would like adjusted (in this image from bottom to top). The adjustment darkens the foreground highlights.

The second is the “adjustment brush” shown below. This tool uses exactly the same sliders as the gradient tool, only this time you can paint the adjustment anywhere on the image. Ticking the “auto mask” box prevents the adjustment accidentally leaking across a sharp edge. Hovering the mouse over the point reveals which parts of the image have been painted over (as shown below in red).

This adjustment is particularly useful for brightening the faces in a portrait or for darkening bright distractions near the edge of an image. The secret is to make only small adjustments so your image still looks natural. You can change the adjustment at any time.

Content Aware Scale

The content aware scale is a little used Photoshop utility (which has been available since CS4)  but its results can be absolutely magic. It is ideal for compositions with several subjects spaced out against a plain background. If you would like to bring the subjects closer together, or to change the aspect ratio of the image without cropping it, a content aware scale may work for you. First select the part of the image you would like to scale with a rectangular box (or use “select all”). Then select “Edit/Content Aware Scale” as shown below.

Now move the edges of your image inwards and watch the magic happen. Look carefully and make sure non of the main subjects are compressed by the effect. The vacated parts will be filled with background colour, but you can remove them with a crop.

Correcting Horizontals and Verticals

One member asked how to correct an image where the main subject is tilted at a strange angle. There are alternative two ways of doing this. The first and simplest method is to rotate the image and crop it. This method is best used for an image, such as a seascape, where the horizon is tilted or an image, like the one below, where an object which should be vertical (the church tower) is leaning to one side.

The example shows the crop tool in “camera raw”. Right-click on the image and ensure that “Show overlay” is ticked. Move the mouse outside the crop area and drag the edges to rotate the crop until the overlaid lines match up with the horizontals and verticals in the image.

If your image is more complicated, such as an architectural shot, the second method is to use the lens correction filter, as shown below. The “camera raw” lens correction filter is easier to use. Click on the tool which looks like a lens schematic “()()”. The “rotate” slider rotates the image, just as before. Use this slider to line up the horizontals and verticals in the centre of the image. The “vertical” and “horizontal” sliders can be used to correct the horizontals and verticals at the edge of your image. (The “distortion” slider can be used to straighten lines if your shot is taken with a wide angle lens.)

The lens correction filter in Photoshop itself has the same controls, but the “rotate” control is very fiddly to use.

After using the lens correction filter you will need to crop the image. If the sloping edges mean you lose something important outside the crop, it is possible to crop slightly outside the boundary and use a “Content Aware Fill” (available from CS6 onwards) to fill the missing parts. You should treat this fill like a clone and repair any odd-looking artefacts with the healing brush.

Don’t Make The Mistake I Made

Here is an image showing a mistake I made when creating a black and white image. The black and white conversion tool in Photoshop can be used to convert a colour image to black and white. The tool lets you adjust the colour sliders, or apply one of a number of presets, until you get the effect you want. Sometimes you will find different conversions work better in different parts of the scene. In the image below I applied two different black and white conversions to the bottom and the top of the image.

The mistake I made? The opacities of the two conversion layers don’t add up to 100%! Right in the middle there is a patch which looks black and white but actually has a tiny hint of colour. The mistake is revealed by boosting the saturation. To ensure you never make this mistake, always add a black and white conversion or desaturation layer which acts on the whole image.

Solarization Effect

Finally, here is a special effect you can try on an image with boring highlights, such as a blank and uninteresting sky. Applying a curves adjustment in the shape of an upside down “U” will create a solarization effect in which the dark parts of the image are shown in positive and the lighter parts are shown in negative.

You can vary the effect by dragging the top of the curve left or right, and you can use a layer mask to confine the effect to just part of your image. For example, the mask in the above image prevents the effect changing the white parts of the stones.

I hope these hints and tips will help members to adjust their images or have some fun with the special effects.

 

24 January 2019 (Swedish Interclub)

Musselburgh Camera Club -

This week club members had a chance to be judges themselves. We discussed 36 images sent to us by Mölnlycke Fotoklubb in Sweden. There were an impressive collection of images covering a wide range of subjects: portraits, street photography, woodland scenes, misty winter landscapes, some interesting night shots and some creative abstract shots. We were especially interested in the images this year, because some of our members are planning to visit Mölnlycke Fotoklubb and may be able to visit some of the places where those images were taken. The images generated a lot of discussion, with members commenting on each image while scribes write down the comments. At the end of the evening we selected the images we liked and then ordered them by popular voting.

The winning image was a stunning night shot taken at a water hole in a Kenyan wildlife reserve. It was a superb composition with a tree acting as a focal point and the waterside leading your eye to the animals in front of a starry background. The image was very dark on our projector but we still liked it a lot. For second place, members chose a portrait of a lovely group of ponies in Rörö wildlife park. Third place went to a long exposure night shot of a ride in an amusement park entitled “loop”, fourth place to a peaceful shot of a lakeside with an archway of trees and fifth place to a portrait of a potter holding his pipe.

Thank you Mölnlycke Fotoklubb for sending us the images. Congratulations to the winner, and some of us look forward to seeing you in a few months’ time.

 

Human Portrait Print Submission

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I forgot to mention at the Swedish inter-club meeting, that this Thursday, 31st January is the submission date for the Human Portrait print competition. Please bring along up to 3 mounted prints (colour or black and white). If you haven’t entered this competition before, it is open to any print where the main subject is a person or group of people.

This Thursday, George will also be accepting entries for the 2019 SPF print championship. Since we are missing the 26 January drop-off deadline, George has offered to hand them in personally to the competition organisers (before the later 7th February deadline). Members can enter up to 6 mounted prints each: 3 monochrome and 3 colour at a cost of 70p per print. Any print which hasn’t been entered into that competition before is valid, not just prints from this year. If you are bringing portrait prints to enter into the SPF competition, make sure they are added to the correct folder.

Click here to see a PDF describing the competition.

 

Possible club trip to Harris & Lewis around October 2019

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Here is the information from Jim Tod about the trip to the western isles he is suggesting for later this year and is happy to arrange on behalf of the club. If you are interested please email Jim at jim@todfamily.me.uk so he can keep you informed. Jim would like to meet with those interested early in February to talk about the arrangements and see if the trip would be feasible.

Club Visit to Lewis & Harris in Autumn 2019 – Jim Tod

The time-frame would be late October to early November 2019, but preferably late  October just before the clocks change: sunrise 8am, sunset 6pm-ish, dipping back to 7.30am to 5pm-ish when the clocks change.

For me it’s mainly a landscape trip but I’m not averse to a bit of wildlife photography. If there are clear skies (and perhaps aurora) then I’d be aiming for a bit of astrophotography also: dark skies galore if the weather’s good. There are lots of classic places: Luskentyre, Seilbost, Scarista, Hushinish, Northton salt marshes, Rodel Church, Gold Road, Mangersta, Callanish and anywhere else that works for us. There would be an opportunity to head over for a bit to North Uist.

I’d be planning to travel on the ferry from Uig in north Skye, not far from Quirang, Fairy Glen and Old Man of Storr. There would be an option for people to add some  time on Skye if they wished, as the journey is a good 5-6 hours’ drive and 2 hr ferry, and the hotel in Uig is a minute from the terminal. Another option would be to travel via the Ullapool to Stornoway ferry. Ullapool is a quicker drive by about 1-1.5 hours but the ferry trip is longer at 3.5 hours and there’s another hour’s drive from Stornoway to Tarbert.

For the accommodation plan I would aim for a B&B in Harris, or a hotel subject to availability. For meals, maybe packed lunches from the hotel and then it depends where we are at night for either dinner in the hotel or somewhere else. The planned duration would be 5 to 6 days. The duration really depends on ferry times which change on different days of the week.

Depending on numbers I’d be suggesting no more than 2 or 3 people in a car which is more about getting all the kit there (camera kit, wellies, wet weather gear) and allowing flexibility on the island for those who wish to do different things at different times.

Budget-wise I think £450-600 would be the order for a B&B for 5 to 6 nights plus a share of the ferry trip. Shared fuel, lunch, dinner and drinks would be on top of that.

Please email me at jim@todfamily.me.uk  if you are interested, and speak to me at a club meeting, and we can discuss the options in early February,

Jim Tod

17 January 2019 (Quiz Evening)

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This week club members divided themselves into 4 teams and spent an enjoyable evening answering some fiendishly tricky questions posed by Ken Sharp. We started the evening identifying various statues located in the Edinburgh New Town. (Ken explained the history of the statues when he revealed the answers.) We then we moved on to identifying the settings used to take a collection of images of the same scene. The second half of the quiz involved questions on the history of photography and matching images to the famous photographers who took them. Finally, Ken had a reply to the “Which manufacturer makes the best camera?” question posed last year by Jim Tod. Ken’s question was “What is the best camera?” to which the answer is, “Whatever camera you have with you”. Ken explained that being ready to capture an image is the important thing, so having any camera is better than no camera at all.

The competition was won by the “Right back 4” team, with Liz Sowler, Malcolm and Lorraine Roberts and me. Thank you very much to Ken for entertaining us.

10 January 2019 (The Camera Never Lies)

Musselburgh Camera Club -

Our club meetings resumed after the Christmas break with a talk by Edinburgh photographer Neil Scott FRPS (who had given us an entertaining talk, “Keep It Simple Stupid” in 2017). We were one of the first camera clubs to hear a brand new talk from Neil:  “The Camera Never Lies”.

Neil explained that he likes to specialise in 3 kinds of photography: Still Life, Street Photography and Surreal or Abstract photography. He showed us in each of those categories how the photographs can lie about a subject. A common technique is translocation, where a subject is extracted from one scene and added to another, unrelated background. Neil is particularly successful at doing this in his street photography, where a snatched shot of someone against a cluttered background becomes a studio-like shot of that same person against a fresh background. In one example, a shot of a gothic street performer in the Royal Mile looked much more dramatic against a graveyard. Neil has the knack of being able to crop right in on his subjects to cut out the clutter. Neil is also extremely imaginative: combining seemingly unconnected subjects together to make an impact. If you want your subject to look like they are in jail, place them against a crumbling wall and use a photograph of a grill pan in the foreground to make the bars!

Neil also showed us how he constructs his still life and abstract images. Some of them start as an idea seen in passing: a coffee mug placed oddly on a saucer or a picture hanging on a wall in the background. Neil will play with an image until it works; sometimes replacing all the original components on the way.

Neil finished his presentation by taking us through a history of fakery in photography, which has been happening long before Photoshop let you do it more easily. From the Cottingley Fairies to the less favoured compatriots of Lenin or Stalin being conveniently air-brushed out of their publicity photographs, the camera has had the ability to lie to us since the day it was invented.

 

Observing Comet 46P/Wirtanen

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As I mentioned at yesterday’s club meeting, there is a comet moving across the sky this weekend. It is called “46P/Wirtanen” and is currently moving North through the constellation of Taurus, which is just to the right of the constellation of Orion. You should be able to see the comet by looking south around 10pm. The comet is supposed to be visible to the naked eye, but you need to look very carefully. It is larger than the size of the full Moon, and if you see it it will look like a faint, fuzzy blob. Any nearby street lights or thin cloud in the sky will spoil the view, so you will need to find somewhere dark. There are some dark spots along the coast at Longniddry Bents, or up Birsley Brae.

If it’s too faint for your eyes, a pair of binoculars will help (the larger the better). Better still, you could try photographing the comet! A long exposure on the digital camera will bring up more detail than you can see with your eyes. On a photograph you’ll notice the comet is green. There is a photograph of the comet displayed at http://www.spaceweather.com/, where they say:

This comet is an easy target for digital cameras with exposures as short as 10 to 30 seconds. Astrophotographer Juan Carlos Casado offers some advice to novices: “Use Raw file format, a fast lens (at least f/2.8) and ISO settings between 1600 and 3200. The exposure will depend on the focal length. I normally use the 500 rule–that is, exposure = 500 / focal length (mm). It also helps in areas with light pollution to use an antipollution filter. I am now using Optolong L-Pro clip filter which gives excellent color balance.

What the photographer doesn’t say is that you will need to set your camera to manual mode. Manually set the focus on infinity, mount the camera on a tripod, turn off vibration reduction (if your lens has it), set the camera to “M” mode and set the aperture and shutter speed manually. You can use a standard lens, rather than a telephoto, because the comet is quite large. Check out the Christmas tree photo at spaceweather.com.

You can find sky charts of the comet at http://www.cometwatch.co.uk/comet-46p-wirtanen/ and there is a live image of the sky showing where the comet is right now at https://theskylive.com/46p-tracker.

Best of luck!

Steven.

13 December 2018 (Black and White Print Competition)

Musselburgh Camera Club -

This week we had the privilege of entertaining Doug Berndt, president of the Edinburgh Photographic Society, who judged our black and white print competition. Doug said he judges photographs by considering their impact, story, quality, creativity and composition, and the best images need to score well in all 5 categories.

There were 45 prints entered altogether. This gave Doug time to appraise each image in detail, point out good features or mistakes and try out different crops. Some good quality images lost out because they didn’t have an impact, so it pays to think about the story you are telling at the time an image is captured. Would a different angle or different location help? Are there distracting things in the background? There were also some highly creative and promising images which lost out on quality, primarily because they had blown highlights or lost detail in the shadows. Some prints had colour casts, and Doug suggested members with Epson printers could try using “advanced black and white mode” to remove the casts. A special mention goes to Colin Dempster, whose image entitled “The Moment Of Truth – Italian Explorers Selection” had everyone, including Doug, guessing what it meant.

The top scorers in the black and white print competition were (in reverse order):

  • 5th place (48 points)
    • Malcolm Roberts
  • 4th place (49 points)
    • Sean Connor
  • 3rd place (51 points)
    • Joe Fowler
  • 2nd place (55 points)
    • Jim Tod
  • 1st place (57 points)
    • George Todd

Well done to George Todd, who retains his black and white title. George’s image “Swayambunath Temple Lady” was the top image of the competition.

The top images were:

  • Swayambunath Temple Lady (George Todd) – 20 points
  • Sunflower Mono (Jim Tod) – 20 points
  • Dirt and Dust  (Joe Fowler) – 19 points
  • Moscow Metro (George Todd) – 19 points
  • Low Tide (Joe Fowler) – 18 points
  • The Lost Pay Packet (Jim Tod) – 18 points
  • Chitwan Girl (George Todd) – 18 points
  • My Brother (Sean Connor) – 18 points

Photographers Wanted for MAMA Revue Dress Rehearsal

Musselburgh Camera Club -

The club has received the following message from Jane Renton, president of the Musselburgh Amateur Musical Association.

It is nearing that time of year again when MAMA stage their annual Revue in the Brunton theatre. Over the past few years we have been delighted to welcome members of Musselburgh Camera Club to take photos of our dress rehearsals and we would like to offer this opportunity again. We would hope this would provide members with an opportunity to practice their skills in a theatre setting where changing light levels may prove an interesting challenge. In return, we would be grateful if you could provide us with some images which we could use for publicity and to put on our website ,which is currently being developed. We would also acknowledge the camera club in our programme.

This years Revue dress rehearsal is on Wednesday, 16th of January 2019 usually starting around 7 -7:30pm.

If anyone is interested could they please drop me an email at  jane.renton@btinternet.com  and I can confirm details nearer the time.

Kind Regards

Jane Renton

Dean Bricknell talk at Beeslack Penicuik Camera Club

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This coming Thursday, 6th December 2018, there will no meeting at Fisherrow. Instead we will be travelling to Beeslack Penuick Camera club to see a presentation by wildlife photographer Dean Bricknell. This is a shared meeting between Beeslack and Musselburgh. No tickets are needed, and all members are invited to attend. The presentation starts at 7:30pm.

Those who travelled to the 4-way competition on 1st November will remember the directions, but here they are again. Beeslack Penicuik Camera Club meets at

Beeslack Community High School
Edinburgh Road
Penicuik
EH26 0QF

Click the above address for a map and directions to the school. The image below shows where we are meeting. If you are approaching from the Edinburgh direction on the A701, turn left when you see the small sign to Beeslack High School on the right hand side of the road. Follow the yellow route shown to the car park around the back of the school, then follow the dotted path to the school entrance. The meeting will be taking place somewhere within the building marked with the “X”.

As before, George Todd is willing to pick up members who would like a lift from Western Musselburgh. Please email George (address on the front of the syllabus) and give him your contact phone number if you would like a lift. I will be glad to give a lift to anyone who lives on the Eastern side of Musselburgh, near Wallyford. Please email me (Steven Beard, address also on the front of the syllabus) if you would like a lift. We both have limited space, so it will be first come first served.

I look forward to seeing you all in Penicuik again.

29 November 2018 (Digital Knockout Competition – Transparency)

Musselburgh Camera Club -

The club’s annual digital knockout competition took place this week. Members had spent the summer collecting images on the challenging theme of “transparency” and had interpreted the theme in creative ways. Many of the subjects were still life arrangements of transparent glasses and bottles, although there was one ghost! Some images were taken through a rainy window, through water and even through wet rice paper, and some images used a veil or curtain to give a feeling of transparency.  About 36 images were entered altogether, and after 3 knockout rounds there were 5 images remaining in the final round. Members voted for their favourites, and the final result was:

  • In 5th place, “Liquid Gold”, a still life of a golden drink being poured into a glass, by Jennifer Davidson.
  • In 4th place, “Through The Window”, an intriguing image of a room viewed through a window, by Simon Wilkinson.
  • In 3rd place, “Bubbles In A Glass”, a still life of a glass with large bubbles at the top, by Jennifer Davidson.
  • In 2nd place, “Through The Curtain”, a portrait of a model looking through a net curtain, by Jennifer Davidson.
  • In 1st place, “Face At The Window”, a portrait of a monk looking through a rainy window, by Joe Fowler.

Well done to Jennifer Davidson, who got all 3 of her images into the top 5, and congratulations to the winner, Joe Fowler, who won a box of transparent fake diamonds!

Swimming Duo impress

Musselburgh Marlins -

Article Taken from East Lothian Courier Two Musselburgh Amateur Swimming Club members struck gold at the Scottish Disability Sport National Junior Swimming Championships. Sam Downie, 12, and Neil Ferguson, 16, represented the Lothian team at the competition for sensory impaired and physically disabled swimmers at Grangemouth winning five medals. Downie won gold in the 75m… Read More »

22 November 2018 (Introduction to Audio-Visual Presentations)

Musselburgh Camera Club -

On Thursday, 22nd November I gave club members an introduction to making audio-visual presentations. Audio-Visual presentations are another way to show your work, in addition to prints and digital projected images. Click on the following link to download the notes from my presentation.

MCCIntroductionToAudioVisualsNotes

You can create a slide show with captions, animation and basic sound effects using PowerPoint. Clive Davies showed us how PowerPoint can be used to present a large number of images within a surprisingly small file size. The image compression is sufficiently good that the image quality on screen looks just as good as the original.

To make a full audio-visual presentation you will need extra software. The club recommends Photodex ProShow for Windows PC users. You can download a trial copy from http://www.photodex.com/proshow. Mac users can try Boniten Photo Theatre Pro, which is a similar product.

The evening finished with some example audio-visual presentations. Gus Langlands showed us one of the first presentations he and John Knox had put together, taking the viewer on a tour of the sites around East Lothian. The images for that presentation were scanned from slides. Gus and John create their sound track using Magix Sound Forge audio editing software, which can edit a sound track in the same way that Photoshop can edit an image. Unwanted clicks and pops can be “healed” out.

This coming Thursday, 29th November we have a knockout competition on the theme of “transparency” (i.e. subjects which are transparent or evoke the theme of transparency, not slides). Please bring along 1, 2 or 3 JPEG images on the night. If you can’t be present please email your images to George Todd. Members will vote for their favourite images on the night, and the best image will win a prize!

 

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